olympic sailing

Paralympic sailing article

The following is the a very good article about the Canadian Sonar team, Tingley Campbell Lutes.  They have consistently been in the top three on the world cup circuit.  This makes them the only Canadian in the olympic sailing events that I expect to come home with a medal.  The rest of the team looks good, but good results for the able bodied sailors are top 10 finishes, not standing on the podium.

The other thing this article does is address the water quality issue.  There is large amounts of raw sewage in the bay where the sailing events will take place.  This creates an obvious health issue.   Sailing specific media has talked this issue to death, but this is the first time I have seen any mention of water quality issues from any mainstream media outlet.

Good job CBC!

Here's the video:

Sail boat racing on you tube.

I have been especially spoiled for choice for sailing video to watch this winter.

The racing in the Volvo Ocean race has been very tight.  Check it out here bellow.  There is also a daily video report and loads of other information at: http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/home.html




I have also been enjoying the last two events of the extreem 40 catamara series.  It's on Youtube here:




Earlier this year I also watched the medal race coverage of the Olympic Classes regatta in Abu Dhabi.  I did watch all of this 6hr video, but I didn't do it in one sitting.  Work and such got in the way.



The Barelona World race is on right now with double handed teams racing non stop around the world in open 60's.  Hugo Boss was doing great!  Until they lost their rig and now their out.  That only leaves one English speaking boat, Conrad Colman on "Spirit of Hungary"  It's quite a good story how he came to be on the boat and they are producing some interesting content, but unfortunately they are in last place. Check out the race here:  http://www.barcelonaworldrace.org/en/

I have neglected this blog a bit since last summer.  I would like to get back on track and produce a weekly post again.  Watch this space!

Saturday Sailing #38

Volvo Ocean race at sea for christmas







Canadian Olympic Sailors had a successful worlds in Perth

Two or more Canadian boats are in this vid:


6 Canadians are now qualified to go to the olympics.  Story here:
http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Canadian-Sailing-Team---Perth-2011.html?soid=1103755470060&aid=kATe0FZmOmg


Mike Golding completed the Transat B to B single handed open 60 race:






Cat meets bridge ...






Clever animation that has nothing to do with sailing.


Address Is Approximate from The Theory on Vimeo.

Why IOC and ISAF decisions affect amature sailors - Part III

Continuing with the list of decisions made by the ISAF equipment committee and how they will affect local sailors.

5) Introduce a high performance skiff class for women.  There will be an equipment trial for this event that will possibly result in new skiff designs that can be sailed by mixed husband and wife teams.  As this new boat gets exposure and becomes more popular, it may start turning up at our local club races.  A new toy toy to play with can only be a good thing.

6) Introduce a new kite boarding medal event for men and women.  As more people see kite boarding on TV in the Olympics, more people may want to come out and try it.  There is a local windsurfing school.  This school may take up teaching kite boarding as it increases in popularity.

7) Keep the 49er for the men's high performance skiff.  This decision affects local sailors similarly to the 470 as the 49er has a youth development boat that leads directly to the adult version in the 29er.  Keeping the 49er won't have much affect locally as there aren't many 29ers or 49ers around locally.  It's still a cool boat though.

8) Keep the Laser full rig for men single handed sailors, and the Laser radial for women single handed sailors. Both of these boats have served our sport well.  They are all affordable and sailed in large fleets locally.  They are also an awfull lot of fun to sail.  The introduction of a dinghy that filed the same niche could only be counterproductive at both a national and local level.

9) Keep the Finn for single handed heavy weight men.   The Finn has served international sailing well as a more technical boat to sail than the laser that is suitable for a more average weight man.  The laser requires a crew weight that is slightly below the average male.  This is the one decision that I am not sure about. It seems a bit odd to have both a light weight single hander and a heavy weight dinghy.  This class may be vulnerable for replacement with a boat that better meets IOC criteria.

And that brings me to the end of how high level political decisions in the sailing world governing bodies affect local sailors  Did I give you some information you didn't have?  Was this post useful to you?  Should I continue with such long wordy posts?

Why IOC and ISAF decisions affect amature sailors - Part II

Here's the first 5 decisions made by the ISAF equipment committee regarding medal events for 2012 and how they will affect local sailors

1) Remove the Men's keel boat competition that is currently sailed in Stars.  There are some local Star sailors, but they are unlikly to be affected by this change.  They will still happlily sail against each other in their own events.  Less CYA resources will go to Star sailors nationally, but they aren't getting much now anyway.

2) Keep the Woman's match racing format that will be first sailed at the London games in 2012.  I predict that since match racing meets the spectator and media friendly requirements of the IOC, the men will want to get in on the action as well.  This may result in a mixed keel boat match racing event with both men and women.  Locally I hope this trickles down to a local match race event.  It seems like something the M242 fleet would be interested in.

3) Reintroduce a catamaran event.  This event will be sailed with mixed teams of men and women.  The concept of mixed sex events is unique to sailing.  No other sport can do this on a level playing field.  This is one of the things that will help keep sailing in the Olympics  A lot of local fleets have mixed crews already, but this may result in some more respect for the crews that do this.  Hopefully this will influence the high performance classes like the Volvo 70s.

4) Change the 470 event to a mixed teams event.  The national level sailors are not happy about being required to break up the teams that they have spent years developing, but it will probably turn out for the best.  IOC is not going to allow more medal events for sailing, so there have to be some changes.  The athletes will probably accept this decision because it is better than having your event removed from the games as first the cats and now the Star have had to deal with.  The 470 class has a direct effect on local sailing. The 420, its development class, is very actively sailed locally.  I think it will be mostly positive as the class will probably get more exposure as they are breaking new ground and trying new things.

Continued in part III...


Why IOC and ISAF decisions affect amature sailors - Part I

First off some definitions.  IOC is the international Olympic committee.  They make the rules governing the Olympic games.  ISAF is the International Sailing Association of Federations.  They govern the rules of the sport of sailing for all participating national sailing organizations and classes of boats.  Each national sailing organization is set up essentially to develop Olympic competitors. In Canada this is CYA.

Now, the first decision that affects us as sailors is the IOC's criteria for a sport to remain part of the Olympics.  Early last year the IOC updated its criteria to keep the Olympics relevant and interesting to all nations.  My understanding of this extensive document is that In order for a sport to stay part of the Olympics they must: be accessible, affordable, played by the majority of countries in the world, and spectator friendly, and generate media interest and coverage. IOC also decided that sailing would be required to stay with the same number of medal events.

This raises some issues for sailing.  We have some classes such as the Star boat that do not meet any of these requirements but are an Olympic class.  (http://www.starclass.org/index.shtml).  We also have several classes that only meet most of the requirements such as the Laser.  Lasers as you know have an international following, are popular in many areas of the world, and are affordable when compared to other race boats.

Now we get to the ISAF decision that affects sailors.  ISAF must keep sailing as an Olympic sport in order to justify its own existence.  If there is less international sailing competition, there is less need for the ISAF.  So the ISAF equipment committee wrote a recommendation in November that will make some major changes for the classes and formats that compete for medals in the Rio games in 2016.  Here are some of the changes that were recomended in november and how they may effect local sailors.  These changes are not official and will be voted on in the spring.  I will detail these in part II.

Canadian Olympic sailors

The Canadian Olympic sailors have a new support organization called Wind Athletes Canada.  They have sailors prepping for the 2012 games in England.

They have a cool video of  David Hayes, Kevin Stittle and Mariano Benitez windsurfing from Thornbury to Collingwood via Christian Island, and while you're there you should surf around and check out the site.

http://www.windathletes.ca/olympic-classes